Alan Dalton post's birding diaries and original artwork from Sweden. Established in 2006, this now long running blog is now a complete overview of my birding experiences. As an artist I greatly enjoy sketching birds in the field and you will find a wide selection of that work here, from fieldwork to finished paintings. I am very passionate about my artwork and try to depict birds in their natural habitat, as I see them in the wild. My artwork is for sale and can be viewed at http://www.alandalton.net/
As regards to my photography, since 2008 I have used a Nikon D90 DSLR camera coupled with a Sigma 150-500mm OS lens for since March 2012 for bird photography, all previous images being digiscoped. Regarding sound recording, I have been usung a Telinga Stereo Dat Mic and parabol to record birds in the field, coupled to a Marrantz 661 digital recorder, a superb piece of kit. Interest in butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies has recently seen the accquisition of a Sigma 150mm macro lens. I hope you enjoy the blog and please feel free to leave comments or contact me at alandltn@gmail.com

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Falsterbo; 30th September 2010

Woodpigeon migrating under a post dawn moon...











Some images of migrating Jay. Just under sixty birds were observed during the morning...



Fyren Lighthouse, Falsterbo.



12,600 Woodpigeon passed in just a few hours, high up and typically in flocks off 200-300.



Woodlark migrating, the call is most distinctive. Note the characteristic short tail.



With just a few hours to spare in the morning I opted to sit at Kolabacken in order to give me more time birding and arrived at daybreak. Shades of the past few days yet again, huge numbers of migrating Woodpigeon observed high over head. Corvids were on the move, chiefly Jackdaw with smller numbers of Rook involved. Jays were a big feature again and a lot of birds flying south as far as the lighthouse before retreating back inland. Several Woodlark flew over calling, a lovely flutey flight call unmistakeable. Brambling and Chaffinch were everywhere, coming in against the northeast wind. Coal Tits were noted for the second day in a row, amongst the streams of migrating Blue Tit. Sparrowhawks moved south overhead, Common Buzzard and other raptors id not move though, perhaps later in the afternoon after I had left.
I found myself rather torn to be leaving as the birding has been exceptional, even though the conditions have not. The wind has been wrong for massive scale migration and I can only imagine how impressive the spectacle must be, for example one might expect upwards of 100,000 Chaffinch/Brambling per day alone in southwesterlies, all pouring out over the sea at low altitude from Nabben, along with scores of other species. I guess I will just have to return to see that particular scenario. Having had a taste of the birding at the site and witnessed extraordinary scenes of diurnal migration I would urge birder's to consider a visit to the site for a truly unforgetable experience, certainly one that will dwell long in my memory.
Over the few days the following 115 species were seen without any real effort, I was on foot and spent each day close to the observatory. A car would make many more species available, as would an earlier visit;
Red Throated Diver, Black Throated Diver, Great Crested Grebe, Cormorant, Grey Heron, Mute Swan, Eurasion White Fronted Goose, Bean Goose, Greylag Goose, Canada Goose, Barnacle Goose, Dark Bellied Brent Goose, Shelduck, Mallard, Gadwall, Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon, Teal, Tufted Duck, Common Eider, Common Scoter, Velvet Scoter, Long Tailed Duck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Red Breasted Merganser, White Tailed Eagle, Greater Spoted Eagle, Red Kite, Black Kite, Marsh Harrier, Hen Harrier, Rough Legged Buzzard, Common Buzzard, Honey Buzzard, Sparrowhawk, Kestrel, Hobby, Peregrine Falcon, Merlin, Pheasant, Coot, Common Crane, Avocet, Ringed Plover, Grey Plover, Golden Plover, Lapwing, Knot, Dunlin, Redshank, Greenshank, Bar Tailed Godwit, Curlew, Snipe, Long Tailed Skua, Black Headed Gull, Common Gull, Herring Gull, Lesser Black Backed Gull, Greater Black Backed Gull, Little Gull, Sandwich Tern, Stock Dove, Woodpigeon, Cuckoo, Short Eared Owl, Black woodpecker, Greater Spotted Woodpecker, Lesser Spotted Woodpecker, Skylark, Woodlark, Sand Martin, House Martin, Barn Swallow, Richards Pipit, Meadow Pipit, Tree Pipit, White Watail, Yellow Wagtail, Grey Wagtail, Wren, Dunnock, Robin, Redstart, Song Thrush, Redwing, Mistle Thrush, Fieldfare, Blackbird, Blackcap, Chiffchaff, Goldcrest, Great Tit, Coal Tit, Blue Tit, Treecreeper, Jay, Jackdaw, Rook, Hooded Crow, Raven, Magpie, Starling, Tree Sparrow, Chaffinch, Brambling, Linnet, Redpoll, Goldfinch, Greenfinch, Siskin, Hawfinch, Common Crossbill, Reed Bunting.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Falsterbo; 29th September 2010

Thermals full off Buzzards, an amazing spectacle...



Fyren Lighthouse just after dawn...



White Tailed Eagle, a young bird...



Migrating Jay; early to see this species moving in numbers, potentially an eruptive species..


A couple of Red Kites way up there in the air...



A stunning young Hobby hunts insects overhead...



The markings on the undercarriage and lack of cinnamon vent confirm this as a young bird...



Supersonic flying machine. A quite incredible bird to watch in the air...



Falsterbo Bird Observatory.


At Nabben yet again for dawn, though today a freezing cold northerly seemed to have affected the birds and little migraton was evident early in the morning. The exception were Eider offshore and Blue Tit, both of which were moving in numbers. Woodpigeon passage was phenomenal, huge flocks swept south all day at high altitude. Raptor passage was almost non existent until the sun broke free from cloud at 9am, when Common Buzzard and Red Kite began to move, though today they were moving along a line further inland. I decided to move position and made my way to Kolabacken, a move which paid off, the raptors were now viewable at closer range, if a little higher up than usual. About 900 Common Buzzard passed in just two hours along with 52 Red Kites. Best of all were 3 Rough Legged Buzzards, very nice to see them indeed, theis white tails gleaming in the early morning sunlight. Another bonus along the way were two White Tailed Eagle, huge in comparison to Common Buzzard and easy to pick out. The wind began to switch to a more easterly vector at around 11am., passage came to a halt as suddenly as it had started.
Though little was moving I managed to pick out some nice bird over the rest of the day. Some Red Kite lingered, with the odd bird migrating over the sea, likewise Common Buzzard, the odd flock appearing every now and then. A real bonus late in the afternoon, a dark bird, which I nearly passed off for a Red Kite drifted north, far up above. Something made me look twice and I realised I was looking at my first swedish Black Kite, a rarity, though rather regular at this site in very small numbers. Barnacle Geese were moving all day in skeins overhead, though it was Jay that caught my attention, several flocks moving high overhead. Mistle Thrush were also numerous today, 46 birds were logged today, not a bad total in light of recent days. Woodlarks were migrating too, as were corvids. The day ended well with a stunning juvenile Hobby which gave a great display around me as it hawked insects ove my head. My last full day at the site today, as I sit here on the laptop I can hear Black Woodpecker calling outside the observatory. Just gonna go have a look..

Selected totals as follows; 1,116 Common Buzzard, 64 Red Kite, 242 Sparrowhawk, 2 White Tailed Eagle, 3 Rough Legged Buzzard, 1 Hobby, 52 Jay, 7 Raven, 210 Jackdaw, 132 Rook, 46 Mistle Thrush, 9 Coal Tit, 9 Woodlark, 1,260 Barnacle Goose, 13,680 Wodpigeon, 23 Chiffchaff, 312 Blue Tit, 19 Common Crossbill, 1,240 Swallow.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Falsterbo; 28th September 2010

A sky full of Common Buzzards, an unforgetable experience...



A Red Kite, superb birds...



A low flying Common Buzzard. Variation in plumage is remarkable...



Red Kite circling overhead..



Migrating Barnacle Geese.



Red Kite



Migrating Cranes in formation, lots seen today...


A quite memorable days birding. Left the house before dawn to get to Nabben under clear skies, a good sign. Before I had even reachen Nabben I had seen more Common Buzzard than I had in the whole day yesterday! As the light strengthened it bacame apparent that Common Buzzard were on the move, kettles of bird appeared in the distance before funneling down the peninsula to where we waited, a great sight to behold. Sparrowhawks were constantly flying overhead, also migating strongly. After half an hour the first Red Kite was seen, then five more. A Marsh Harrier passed over, then another fifty Buzzard, then a Hen Harrier, a Short Eared Owl, so it went. Buzzard were passing by the hundred and incredibly my final tally was 1,846 birds!
There were other birds about whilst all this was happening. A glorius Avocet flew right past me early in the morning, not seen one of them for a while! All the regular migrants such as Tree Pipit, Chaffinch, Brambling, Song Thrush, Meadow Pipit and the like were passing over in small numbers, the majority no doubt using the wind and at high altitude in the northeasterly. Over 1,200 Blue Tit migrated from Nabbens tip, an amazing sight as they gather in the bushes at the tip, calling constantly before striking out over the sea in flocks of fifty of sixty strong. Another feature of the day was huge flocks of migrating Woodpigeon up to 400 strong, the first hour alone 5,300 birds passed over my head. All of this was going on at the same time and it really was a fantastic experience.
At noon I head for Kola backen as a lot of Red Kite were passing lower over the site and I wanted a few snaps. Just a few minutes after reaching the area I and three other birders saw a very distant eagle over the sea to the east being mobbed by a Hen Harrier, though the range was extreme and we could not identify the bird. As it happens an eagle seen from Nabben at the same time and seen to migate northeast was identified as a Greater Spotted Eagle. It is not inconceivable that this bird might try migrate again tomorrow...
Other birds on Kolabacken through the afternoon were interesting. Crane dominated, moving in large flocks to the southeast. Also noted were more than 50 Jay, migrating birds searhing for food. Word has it that acorns are rather scarce this year and there may well be an invasion of this species on the way. Also logged were 40 Woodlark, by far the most I have ever seen in a day, two others had been seen that morning at Nabben. Another nice observation were 8 Eurasion White Fronted Geese migrating to the northwest, have not seen too many previously. A Short Eared Owl, a male Marsh Harrier and 2 Hobby brought the day to a lovely end before I headed back to the observatory, where this time my bonus on arrival were 4 Grey Plover flying over the building calling! Selected Totals as follows;

1,846 Common Buzzard, 79 Red Kite, 436 Sparrowhawk, 4 Marsh Harrier, 5 Hen Harrier, 4 Hobby, 1 Eagle Sp., 2 White Tailed Eagle, 2 Short Eared Owl, 14,367 Woodpigeon, 258 Common Crane, 35 Jackdaw, 1 Avocet, 4 Grey Plover, 96 Knot, 354 Barnacle Goos, 8 Eurasion White Fronted Goose, 52 Jay, 42 Woodlark, 1 Black Woodpecker, 43 Common Crossbill.

Wood Lark; Falsterbo; 28th September 2010

Wood Lark; a favourite species of mine, which I have never managed a decent image of before today...


The bird was found feeding on the driving range, despite not being too approachable the bird did allow a reasonable proximity of approach.



A first calender bird, lacking the white patch on the base of the primaries, which adult birds show. Not the supercilium adjoins on the nape. A really stunning lark species...

Today was a great day out birding and along with all the rest I saw no less than 42 Woodlark! All of the birds were on passage and flew overhead calling, including one flock of 26 birds. Whilst watching the skies at Kolabacken I heard this bird flying past and watched it land on the driving range on the golf course. I grabbed the camera and went of to try photoraph it. The results posted above...


Monday, September 27, 2010

Falsterbo; 27th September 2010

Honey Buzzard; as with most late birds this is a first calender bird.




Common Cranes migrating made a great sight today...



Redstart; a late bird and a nice bonus whilst checking the gardens close to the headland.


Up again at 5am., as is the routine and headed straight to Nabben. Northerly winds were rather fresh and it was clear that these were the worst possible conditions for migration. Soon after first light it was apparent that very few passerines were moving and that the sea would provide the best bet. An exception proved to be Common Crane, birds were on the move from first light in raucous flocks and btween 7am. and 1pm. no fewer than 169 birds were logged. A first calender Peregrine was an early highlight form the tip, another was seen a couple of hours later flying to the north.
Passerines were few and far between, the occasional Tree Pipit and a couple of Yellow Wagtails logged early on. A Short Eared Owl put in a brief appearance before ditching into the long grass on the spit off the tip, lovely to watch it through the scope as it quartered along the bank. Bird of the day was a juvenile Long Tailed Skua mid morning, although it was distant to the south moving west. Dark Bellied Brent were moving and a total of 174 were recorded migrating east. Better still were a flock of 10 Bean Goose to the east, of the taiga race. 25 Red Throated Diver were also notable, just a single Black Throated Diver seen in contrast. Late in the watch came 2 Little Gull moving east, very nice to watch over the see, albeit also a little distantly due to the northerly wind.
Raptors were scarce, although 5 Red Kites coming in off the see were a highlight. A large kettle of Common Buzzard bumped the total for the day up to 57 birds, whilst 83 Sparrowhawk were noted. 4 Hobby and 4 ringtail Hen Harriers were noted, along with 5 Marsh Harrier, which included an adult male bird.
The afternoon was quiet and spent checking gardens for passerines. Lot's of Goldcrest and Chiffchaff about, the highlight coming in the form of a young Redstart which posed for the camera on a day when little else did. A late Honey Buzzard was noted, along with a Cuckoo, a bird with no tail that flew past me, a rather confusing moment until I realised what it was.
Totals for the day as follows;

25 Red Throated Diver, 1 Black Throated Diver, 700 Long Tailed Duck, 2367 Eider, 2 Velvet Scoter, 12 Common Scoter, 28 Canada Goose, 98 Barnacle Goose, 10 Bean Goose, 174 Brent Goose, 132 Greylag Goose, 9 Tufted Duck, 3 Gadwall, 8 Shoveler, 6 Pintail, 4 Shelduck, 4 Grey Plover, 19 Knot, 45 Dunlin, Greenshank, 6 Redshank, 1 Golden Plover, 1 Snipe, 169 Common Crane, 3 Grey Heron, 2 Little Gull, 1 Long Tailed Skua, 28 Sandwich Tern, 57 Common Buzzard, 1 Honey Buzzard, 5 Red Kite, 4 Hen Harrier, 5 Marsh Harrier, 4 Hobby, 2 Peregrine Falcon, 83 Sparrowhawk, 34 Stock Dove, 1580 Woodpigeon, 1 Short Eared Owl, 2 Yellow Wagtail, 32 Tree Pipit, 284 Meadow Pipit, 1 Cuckoo, 5 Mistle Thrush, 12 Redwing, 35 Song Thrush, 165 Swallow, 13 House Martin, 4 Skylark, 6 Redpoll, 1240 Chaffinch/Brambling, 1 Redstart, 19 Chiffchaff, 1 Blackcap, 1 Tree Sparrow.

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Falsterbo; 24th September 2010

Kestrel Portrait



A lovely confiding bird this juvenile...



Kestrel juvenile in flight....



Hobby perched in a tree beside the observatory...

Flew from Stockholm at 10am, two buses later from Malmo airport and a gruelling walk with all the gear I dragged down and I got out birding at the site at 3pm. Falsterbo is rather incredible, a migration bottleneck of some fame. The site is famous mainly for raptor migration, though passerine migration is very spectacular too. I visited Falsterbo in 1991 for a day and have always wanted to return, here I was!
The day of arrival was overcast and there had not been a lot of passage that morning as it happened, and most raptors had ceased migrating. The first bird I set eyes on was the wonderfully confiding Kestrel posted above, a nice start. Honey Buzzards followed, two juvenile birds floated high over my head to the southwest. The rest of the evening was spent watching raptor passage, Sparrowhawks would total more than 85 birds after three hours, best of all though were 5 Hobby, two of which performed superbly, impossibly fast in the air as they hunted insects on the wing. Just 4 Common Buzzard were noted before I headed back to the bird observatory where two nice bonuses awaited, Black and Lesser Black-backed Woodpecker, very nice indeed thank you! Off to bed after a bite before an early morning start...

Falsterbo; 26th September 2010

Goldcrest, all over the place today...


Common Buzzard, plenty today...


Hobby high over head hawking dragonflies...


A Goldcrest in the mist nets...



Red Kite; fabulous birds, a dozen seen migrating today...



A difficult day due to a strong Northeasterly winds, which generally speaking is not good for viewing migrants at the site, due to the tendency to take advantage on the wind direction on the birds part by flying at altitude. Nevertheles up at 5am. again and on Nabben for dawn. A Hobby was the first bird of note, moving south and taking a quick pass at a Meadow Pipit without success. Wildfowl were passing, particularily Eider , in large flocks too. Brent Geese, Wigeon, Cormorant and smaller numbers of other species meant on eye had to be kept at sea. Sparrowhawks began to appear, as did the first Marsh Harriers, three together. A couple of ringtail Hen Harriers soon followed, the birds high up and moving quickly. Then Common Buzzards started to move in small numbers, a Merlin was seen blasting along the shore...
Passerines were nowhere near as numerous as yesterday with the exception of large flocks of Woodpigeon. Tree Pipits, Dunnock, Reed Bunting, Meadow Pipit, Siskin and Caffinches/Brambling were in evidence most of the time...
At 09.25am the alarm was raised by one of the official counter's, Richard's Pipit! The bird was calling and I got onto it quickly, enjoyed a binocular view of the bird as it called constantly and flew to the north, a Swedish tick! A Short Eared Owl made a welcome appearance about the long grass of Nabben, whilst the first Red Kite of the trip was seen, this later followed by seven birds together. Mistle Thrush was new for the trip, as was Grey Wagtail, Sand Martin, Golden Plover. I stayed until 11am, final totals as follows;
122 Sparrowhawk, 12 Red Kite, 35 Common Buzzard, 6 Marsh Harrier, 2 Hen Harrier, 1 Short Eared Owl, 1 Hobby, 2 Merlin, 1860 Cormorant, 60 Teal, 468 Wigeon, 21 Red Breasted Merganser, 6 Pintail, 5 Shoveler, 1290 Eider, 46 Dunlin, 5 Bar Tailed godwit, 42 Golden Plover, 3 Gery Plover, 50 Knot, 23 Curlew, 26 Barnacle Goose, 61 Brent Goose, 2 Coot, 9 Redpoll, 1 Richards Pipit, 3 Mistle Thrush, 35 Lapwing, 84 Swallow, 1 Sand Martin, 1245 Woodpigeon, 32 Tree Pipit, 76 Starling,19 Skylark, 1 Woodlark, 32 Stock Dove, 48 Song Thrush, 2 Grey Wagtail, 3 Yellow Wagtail.
Next on the agenda was Kolarbacken for an hour wathing raptors, passage was ok, the following were noted;
40 Common Buzzard; 1 Marsh Harrier, 69 Sparrowhawk, 1 Hobby, 1 Mistle Thrush and common birds in small numbers.
Back at the observatory there was passage too, I decided to sit down there for an hour and counted the following overhead there...
9 Common Buzzad, 107 Sparrowhawk, 3 Hobby and a Marsh Harrier.
Spent the evening wandering about looking for migrants, a few Chiff Chaff and Golcrest about, though nothing of note apart from 8 Common Crossbill. 2 Migrant Hawker Dragonflies wereseen well and I warned them about the Hobby's hunting in the area!

Saturday, September 25, 2010

Falsterbo; 25th September 2010

Male Siskin; Everywhere! Incredible passage of this species today...


Siskin; Female







Awoke at 5am and was out of bed like a rocket, made breakfast and a packed luch and out the door to discover it was westerly with rain. Not generally a good combination I thought, but the day proved interesting in the end.
As expected on arrival at Nabben, the rain and heavy mist knocked some birds back but what the locals wee describing as a terrible migrant passage was still impressive to me. The passage started at 07.30am withn,Siski then more Siskin. By 10.30 am I had logged 2,162 in my notebook. Tree Pipits(111 birds logged) were buzzing over head all through the morning, Meadow Pipits were even more numerous. Chaffinch and Brambling were logged at just 380, incredibly up to 250,000 of these birds can pss through on a good day! The first Sparrowhawk zipped past, then another, Stock Doves high up, passing quickly. Birds were at sea too, the best total was 108 Dark Bellied Brent Goose flying west from the Baltic. Then a juvenile Perigrine put in an appearance, a hightlight of the morning. Some other logged birds as follows;
33 Song Thrush, 42 Reed Bunting, 38 Sandwich Tern, 46 Starling, 6 Bar-tailed Godwit, Redshank, Greenshank, 2 Snipe, 18 Curlew, 6 Ringed Plover, 2 Lapwing, 34 Dunlin, 14 Shoveler, 6 Pintail, 232 Wigeon, Mallard, Goldeneye, 5 Grey Herron, 280 Meadow Pipit, 1420 Brambling/Chaffinch, 1 Skylark, 7 Stock Dove, Woodpigeon,1 House Martin, 52 Swallow, 72 Eider, Robin, Wren, Dunnock, 2 Redpoll, 7 Goldfinch, 4 Greenfinch, 3 Marsh Harrier, 1 Merlin, 1 Hobby, 75 Sparrowhawk, 8 Kestrel, 4 Yellow Wagtail, Rook Hooded, Crow, Magpie and Jay.

From midday I watched the skies at Ljungen Heath, though raptor passage was poor by local standards I did see the following; 26 Common Buzzard, 2 Honey Buzzard, 1 adult Rough Legged Buzzard, 6 Kestrel, 97 Sparrowhawk, 1 Merlin, 2 Marsh Harrier, 100 Golden Plover, 454 Greylag Goose and constant passage, of Meadow Pipit, Tree Pipit, Finches etc. Very nice birding and a god view of a pale Honey Buzzard juvenile was a highlight, In general it was most interesting to take in the variation shown by Common Buzzard.

Still not done I went back to Fyren and Flommen, things were very quiet, though 3 Black Throated Divers were a nice bonus.

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Caspian Gull; 1st Calender; Skeppsbron; 22nd September 2010

Caspian Gull, the second bird onsite this month....



The bird in flight with a Herring Gull. Note the pale head, advanced moult on the mantle and scapulars, the greater coverts forming the classic panel and lacking obvious notching and the whitish tail with demarciated dark tail band...










A couple of useful shots of the bird in the same frame as Lesser Black-backed Gull and Herring Gull. The paleness of the head and neck are obvious. Also noe the rather long necked appearance of the bird in the lower shot. The bill is notably long and paralell sided without an obvious angle at the gonys. Advanced moult again a major feature...





The bird left side. Notable are the pattern on the new scapulars, not perhaps classic Caspian in that they are not solidly marked at the centre, though perhaps are a little worn. Note the dark chocolate centred tertials and delicately marked greater covert's.





The underwing remarkably pale, another pro Caspian feature. The inner primary pattern on the upper primaries on the upperwing are well seen here. Innerwing primary panel not as obvious as on Herring Gull of the same age...





A useful shot of the upperwing ant tail pattern...





Again a decent shot of the upperwing...



Caspian Gull, a second bird for the site this autumn. A first calender bird found by Björn Phragmen yesterday evening. A small and probable female. A pleasure to see this bird today on the way to work, the bird immediately found onsite and came to bread. At this stage it is probably fair to say this bird may prove to be regular at the site in September, albeit just numbering a few individuals each season.




Saturday, September 18, 2010

Gull Reference Albums

Have recently updated my picasa albums and all are now posted in the margin to the right of this post.. I hope to add to these over the coming year's in order to build a useful reference library with regard to Gulls. The most recent album has just been added; 1st Calender Baltic Lesser Black Backed Gull.
Argentatus Herring Gull albums have also been updated, the albums now cover 1st, 2nd and 3rd Calender plumages. There is also a limited album on Caspian Gull. The eventual aim is to have a comprehensive reference library of images of Gulls for use of reference for anyone interested...

Friday, September 17, 2010

Lesser Black-backed Gulls; 1st Calender; Skeppsbron; 17th September 2010

A large dark bird, most probably a male. Aggressive and the same size as Herring Gull.



Upperwing in flight, the same bird as above...


Underparts in flight, again the same bird as above...


The same bird as above on the water. A very long winged appearance on the water. No second generation feathers apparent...



A small bird, most probably a female. Fresh plumaged with no moult in progress...



A very interesting bird to my eye. A pale type bird. This bird shows advanced moult of the mantle and scapulars, whereas most other individuals of the species on site in this age group have shown predominantly juvenile plumage. The bird also displays pale areas on the upper and lower mandibles on the bill. Just an early bred fledged bird of fuscus origin or something more interesting? Could this be a bird from further east where breeding occurs earlier, do fuscus show advanced moult? Apparently a handful begin to moult as early as the first week in August, though this bird still semms very advanced. I'm struggling to find good reference on moult stratagies of both races online.



Close up of the upperwing at rest. Wing covert's appear very abraded and fresh mantle and scapular feathers obvious. Again this is in sharp contrast to other birds onsite which show no second generation feathers to date.


Fresh plumaged bird which has been around for some weeks, the same bird pictured below. A sharp contrast to the advanced moulting bird above....








Some images from today of first calender Lesser Black Backed Gulls of the baltic race fuscus. Very variable birds as these photo's show. Theres just one individual bothering me, advanced moult apparent. The question is can fuscus show advanced moult before departure to the winter quarters? It would seem so....